Common Methods of Identifying a Suspect Most law enforcement agencies continue to use “line-ups” for witness identification. Some consider this the most reliable method of suspect identification available to them, and reserve these procedures for their most serious cases. The process takes time and effort, after all. Police officers must gather “fillers”, who are the additional people standing in the line-up when a witness attempts to identify a suspect. Often, and surprisingly even in very serious cases, police will simply print […]

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For the Accused, A Fair Trial Requires a Full and Open Discovery Process

When it comes to a government prosecuting an individual, the government always has the advantage.  Arguably, the government always has access to greater resources than the accused.  Their case begins with government-funded investigations that essentially have no limits on the amount of time and resources they can assign to a case.  Most prosecutors also have their own investigators who can go out and further investigate any issues […]

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Many people (jurors) assume confessions are a reliable indication of guilt. That makes confessions a very important aspect of a criminal case. Because so many jurors will simply accept a confession as true, presenting unreliable confessions to juries results in innocent people going to prison. We know this is true, and there is every indication that it continues to happen. In fact, of DNA exonerations studied by the Innocence Project, more than 1 out of 4 of those convicted and […]

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Bite Mark Evidence Is Still Getting It Wrong – But Courts Are Fine with That

Bite mark evidence impressed many in the 1970s and 1980s. As an early example, bite marks received plenty of attention during the trial of Ted Bundy. Prosecutors fell in love with the idea that a positive and reliable match between dental records and physical evidence on a victim’s body could be the key to  getting their conviction. Many of them still readily accept that the evidence […]

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No one should have to put up with an abusive or controlling spouse. If you are filing for divorce, you and your spouse will automatically be issued something called a temporary injunction. This is a type of less severe restraining order.

 

Under the temporary injunction, both parties are prohibited from “disturbing the peace” of the other spouse. You will not be able to change, waste, or move marital assets, nor will you be able to move children out of the […]

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Most parenting plans for divorced or separated parents require the parents to make major decisions regarding the children jointly. One of the most important is choosing which school a child will attend.

 

Parents approach this issue with many different priorities and must avoid trying to force the other parent to “parent like I do”. Many parents believe school choice is a simple matter of listing available schools and comparing their academic ratings on a website. Those ratings can be […]

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Many Colorado jurisdictions require parties with divorce and child custody cases to mediate before putting their disagreements forward for a court to decide.

 

Mediation is an informal attempt to resolve a dispute in which a neutral mediator attempts to help parties reach agreement. Mediators do not make binding decisions. In family cases, mediators try to help divorcing husbands and wives or mothers and fathers find agreement by suggesting new compromises after listening to each party’s concerns.

 

I have […]

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